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Thread: Television - is it a necessity?(Sorry I think I've mis spelt that one)

  1. #1
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    Default Television - is it a necessity?(Sorry I think I've mis spelt that one)

    TV is it a modern day ' must have ' or does it pose a more serious problem? I see it as an unsociable destructive medium which weedles its way into people's lives that they no longer talk and discuss life together as families used to do. It always seems to be switched on wining away in the back ground or the volume is turned up blocking open talk and dialogue. It seems to come between people's relationships whether that is the one involving the chat over a pint at the pub or the one between family members. Look at the panic with the signal switch over. An awful ot of people went into panic at losing their chanels even if it was only for an hour or so. Granted that many people who live alone have this as their constant companion and it keeps such people in touch with the world. Is there a happier balance to be struck especially for our children where it is switched on for a limited period for a specific programme and then turned off? Too many are left with the TV as a child minding tool while parents get on with cooking etc. Parenting is hard enough but adding to the difficulties with the subsequent cognitive and social damages is madness. I wonder if we have a no TV hour in every home for one highlighted day and then reflect on what happens rather like the minute silence at 11am on 11/11 each year. It may reveal something- that we can do with out it for example.

  2. #2
    Mari
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    Really I would recommend everyone to get rid of the goggle box, it's a very malign influence. We got rid of ours 20 + years ago. When you see some of the appalling stuff BBC charge for and most of it repeats, you can see what agenda their pushing.
    I'm really quite evangelical about people getting rid of the telly.
    We don't miss it one jot. There is nothing to miss. My husband always says, when he was at school in the 60's, the teachers used to say to the pupils that television with be the complete ruin, not only of this country, but of the world. One thing you have to appreciate as well, I never realized how much propaganda is pushed out by the telly, and how much the powers that be are desperate for people to keep watching the telly.
    There are so many aspects to it, but take it from me, getting rid of it is the best thing you will do. There might be a case for the very elderly who are perhaps very ill, but normally, no.
    There are other ways of getting the news and keeping in touch with current issues , via the internet and radio, newspapers,etc.

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    I agree Mari, I used to live without one when the children were younger but I have relented now to my own detriment I rather feel. We hardly watch it though but I must say watching the Royal Jubilee and the Royal Wedding was great- that's the sort of thing its used for here. I am a real moaning minnie as I cannot abide the endless football rantings going on and it'll soon be the Olympics doing the same with Wimledon in between. Don't get me wrong, sport is healthy and a must for all in one guise or another. Supporting any patriotism what ever it is- England, Wales, Scotland. It is brilliant to be proud of your country. Goodness knows we don't seem to have a lot to be proud of otherwise. Encouraging young people to take a sport up is essential to promote a positive future for them, I just don't want it shoved down my throat all day every day etc as a must like as you say propaganda on the machine which does have an 'off ' button. That is unlike our cabinet ministers who don't seem to have ' off ' buttons.

  4. #4
    rebbonk
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    I rarely watch TV, apart from the odd news programme. If it wasn't for the good lady, I'd bin it and save the licence fee.

    People often look at me as if I'm from a different planet when I don't know who's on X Factor or BGT.

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    Rebbonk- same here. I have no idea about any of the soaps and don't want to either. People actually plan their lives around what's on and what's happening in this and that soap as if it is real life. I think its just sad.

  6. #6
    cathidaw
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    Ilike the tv. So there I've said it. I choose what I like to watch othwise it's off.
    When my family werebabies we had 15minutes per day of childrens daytime tv. I lived out in the sticks,buses from 8 am and every 71 minutes later.'til 8pm. my husband out all dayand if the children were having a bad day that 15 minutes was precious to them and me. We'd sit cuddled up to watch. I occupied them at other times and sometimes it was so tiring especially in a house with not many mod cons. I dont regret those times,we did so many things and none went to nursery and all 3 could read when they started school..Now my grandchildren come and they sit watching their stuff --with a timer--then it goes off and we do things as I am recharged by then.
    Iwatch only what I like and there's not much of that--it's75% drivel.
    I time the children too if they want to use my computer-half an hour a day -unless it's for homework.
    If they complain they miss a day , so they say nothing-just pull a face.
    I also enjoy 2 of the soaps.
    Last edited by cathidaw; 24-06-2012 at 03:21 PM.

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    Cathidaw, I did this when mine were young except until they were 7-10'ish we didn't have a TV. When we did I switched it on for specifics, then it went off. Neither child now 22 and about to be 25 are TV addicts. They'd rather be out climbing mountains, playing rugby etc. Good on you- what you are doing now is operating G'parental control. Sadly- I don't think enough parents do this or even more to the point realise they should be doing so.

  8. #8
    Mari
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    I have nightmares about being in an old folks home and being plunked in front of a blaring telly and being powerless to switch it off!

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    I share this fear. One would hope care improves before too long but there in lies another thread!!!

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    Don't they zonk you out so you are tame and no bother to them? I suspect you might be bright enough to bury your zonking medication in a pot plant or some other clever place just to confuse the staff who will be so busy they won't notice that you disabled the remote,
    Cool

  11. #11
    cathidaw
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    The whole system is rubbish.We always hear of places where people say "my mums in /// and she loves it.They are so kind"etc etc
    Also howmany elderly persons if asked would say otherwise if they live there.)
    I don't believe it. I know they work hard in these places and there may be exceptions, but it's a JOB to most carers or whatever they call themselves.And peanuts are paid so what do you get.
    My sister an ex nurse,worked in a few of thes places and trying to be compassionate was not in the job description. She was sacked for caring too much (twice) for bringing to notice some error in the humane treatment of some of the people.
    I taught art at an altzimers home for 3 months, very difficult they are, I know but people must be treated humanly and allow them dignity,and they werent. Like naughty children instead, with punishments like taking them to their rooms if they objected to something minor. As for medication, in the middle of a class they'd come around with tablets sometimes as many as 6 on a little dish and force them to take them- standing there 'til they'd taken them with a glass of water--and then look into their mouths.
    I saw people come in-and within a months they wre zombies. No pot plants about there.
    The only time it was good was when important visitors came to look around.Visitors who were looking for a home for a relative.The staff were all sickeningly compassionate then.

    I left, firstly because I couldn't stand what I saw every week and secondly, because I questioned certain things and she got suspicious. When I said I'd once upon a time been a nurse--that was it. She phoned that same night to say the classes were disrupting the patients so I' have to go. They loved it and always waved me off saying come again.Even if they didn't do much art--one lady ate the wax crayons and another painted his arms,a few times and it was fun.
    I did report them but it was investigated and 'nothing untoward was found'
    We need something like the Dutch village system where these poor souls can meet and not be shut away like in the madhouses of Victorian times.
    Off my bandwagon now ! ! !
    Last edited by cathidaw; 25-06-2012 at 11:04 PM.

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    Medication to zonk people out- what a merciful release for some from many a hell hole that is if they get the medication right in the first place! One such expose (Acute accent over the 'e') was on the TV- I think it was chanel 4's 'Despatches'. It showed the appalling treatment dealt out by 'carers/nurses' to elderly and mentally ill people. The nurse manager and her husband have since been struck off and inprisoned. I think there is another similar programme about to show,I saw the trailer for it recently. Sadly, it demonstrates that if one place is shown up followed by another one, this is likely to be just the tip of the iceburg.

    Well done Cathidaw for trying to right the wrong but at least you did give a few some positive stimulation with caring support whilst you were at that place.

    Bring back the professional caring vocational nurse and the education that built her/his foundation. It all seems so disconnected from the patient now. I notice frighteninlg more and more that Nurses jobs advertise for 'experience ' with this or that like piece work is done by carpenters and electricians, plumbers etc. In my day you had experience and learning to cover it all and from that as a trained nurse you could manage it all. If you didn't pass the learning phase of that experience then you couldn't progress through training. It was good basic training in an all round rounded way. Then after that, you would specialise after a few years capitalising on that basic foundation. This all seems to have gone out of the window. Anyone can call them selves a Nurse but not every one is a Nurse in the pure true meaning of what is a Professionally Trained Nurse; That is the crux of the matter. Off soap box.

  13. #13
    cathidaw
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    You are so right Gladys. When I was at the 'home' there was a young male trainee nurse who was there for 3 months. He couldn't wait to finish although iwill say he did his best, but he didn't seem to get much 'training'. just the day to day slog. He said it was '.bewildering'
    It was a private home so they probably got him on the cheap.

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    Cathidaw- that's the 'nub' of it. Its cheap labour proferring cheaply ' trained ' nurses. I wonder if that student was on a placement for 3 months as part of his training or whether he'd chosen to do it to supplement his bursary? It would be interesting to know.

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    cathidaw
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    No , Gladys he had no choice he was on placement from Walsgrave Hospital in Coventry --our Palace of woes.

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    All I can say is poor student and what a shambles for his training. I am sure the Private sector in this case paid a 'healthy' fee for a 3 month supply of press ganged students all on bursaries. How was his training and mentoring monitored then? Don't answer that, I can guess. You see , this is what happens to cheapening a profession and service. I am not saying for one minute this student wasn't a hard working, caring and bright individual but what a waste in opportunity to park him in a care home. He needs to be in the middle of the heart of a hospital to learn and be assessed by the whole range of experts that work with in it and to experience the whole range of events that do happen in it. Care homes have limitations on experts and the types of experiences available in one place. They need qualified caring leading professional nurses to lead unqualified caring teams as do all clinical settings. I am sure he enhanced the patient experience and learnt by what he saw and did but I just can't help thinking he was robbed of 3 months worth of something else.

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