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Thread: Warwickshire Words & Phrases

  1. #1
    Administrator Lex's Avatar
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    Default Warwickshire Words & Phrases

    I still say 'Were you born in a barn?': https://www.ourwarwickshire.org.uk/c...ds-and-sayings
    Last edited by Lex; 27-12-2020 at 10:00 AM.

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    Super Moderator rebbonk's Avatar
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    I usually say, 'Put wood in t'ole!'

    Are you sure you've posted the right link, lex?
    Of course it'll fit, you just need a bigger hammer.

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    Pillar of the Community margaret's Avatar
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    A Warwickshire word of phrase I came across was the word, Tazzing, as in the phrase, I saw him tazing down the road, meaning going fast.
    Last edited by margaret; 27-12-2020 at 05:34 PM.
    I doubt sometimes whether a quiet and unagitated life would have suited me - yet I sometimes long for it.

    - Lord Byron.

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    Pillar of the Community margaret's Avatar
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    Another one was ( this nowze) , meaning do it now.
    I doubt sometimes whether a quiet and unagitated life would have suited me - yet I sometimes long for it.

    - Lord Byron.

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    Administrator Lex's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rebbonk View Post
    I usually say, 'Put wood in t'ole!'

    Are you sure you've posted the right link, lex?
    Link corrected! 'Put the wood in the hole' is one I've come across a lot too.

  6. #6
    Super Moderator rebbonk's Avatar
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    Having just read them, I wouldn't dare use the reference to the chicken in polite company. It means something very different where I come from.

    "It's a bit black over Bill's mothers" is a local expression that I hadn't heard until I was quite old.
    Of course it'll fit, you just need a bigger hammer.

  7. #7
    Administrator Lex's Avatar
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    Now I've reread the chicken one, I get the alternative meaning Rebbonk! 'It's black over Bill's mother's' is one I've only come across in the last few years as well.

  8. #8
    Super Moderator rebbonk's Avatar
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    Apparently, it refers to rain clouds coming in from Stratford direction, hence reference to Bill.
    Of course it'll fit, you just need a bigger hammer.

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